HEALTH AND SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS

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July 25, 2018 (San Diego's East County) -- Our Health and Science Highlights provide cutting edge news that could impact your health and our future.

HEALTH

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

For excerpts and links to full stories, click “read more” and scroll down.

HEALTH

Reports Suggest Children Throughout China Likely Injected With Faulty Vaccines (NPR)

hundreds of thousands of children throughout the country have likely been injected with faulty vaccines….  China are one of the largest exporters of vaccines around the world, so this issue goes just beyond China.

Chinese Company's Flawed Vaccines Draw Anger And A Criminal Inquiry  (NPR)

President Xi Jinping has ordered an investigation — and promised serious punishment — after a drug company was found to have faked production records for a rabies vaccine and sold more than 250,000 doses of a vaccine for infants that didn't meet medical standards…Public outrage has grown steadily, with the news echoing a large recall from late last year, when Changsheng recalled 252,600 doses of the infant DPT vaccine (for diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus).

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains (NPR)

Studies show that troops who repeatedly fire powerful, shoulder-launched weapons can experience short-term problems with memory and thinking. They may also feel nauseated, fatigued and dizzy. In short, they have symptoms like those of a concussion.

Pepperidge Farm recalls Goldfish crackers amid salmonella scare (NPR)

Pepperidge Farm announced a voluntary recall of four varieties of Goldfish crackers in a press release on Monday.

Ticks And Lyme Disease: 3 Factors Determine Risk Of Infection  (NPR)

As it turns out, the chance of catching Lyme disease from an individual tick ranges from zero to roughly 50 percent, according to Mather. The exact probability depends on three factors: the tick species, where it came from and how long the tick was feeding.

Friends with Benefits: The latest research (Jewish World Review)

While research on the benefits of social connections has generally focused on the importance of "strong ties," or the intimate relationships we have with family and close friends, a growing body of research is shedding light on the hidden benefits of casual acquaintances, too.

Doctors Worry as Cancer Study Reveals Dark Side of Complementary Medicine (Inverse)

…While promising clinical trials have earned some practitioners of complementary medicine, like acupuncture, a greater degree of acceptance by the medical community in recent years, many patients in the United States, whether out of financial insecurity or mistrust of medicine, are pursuing complementary medicine instead of conventional medicine, rather than as a complement to conventional medicine. A new study in JAMA Oncology suggests that this trend has deadly consequences for cancer patients.

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Adobe is using machine learning to make it easier to spot Photoshopped images (The Verge)

Experts around the world are getting increasingly worried about new AI tools that make it easier than ever to edit images and videos — especially with social media’s power to share shocking content quickly and without fact-checking. Some of those tools are being developed by Adobe, but the company is also working on an antidote of sorts by researching how machine learning can be used to automatically spot edited pictures.

Physicists Go Small: Let's Put A Particle Accelerator On A Chip (NPR)

…Scientists in California think small is beautiful. They want to build an accelerator on semiconductor chips. An accelerator built that way won't achieve the energy of its much larger cousins, but it could accelerate material research and revolutionize medical therapy.

Migrating Arctic Geese Are Confused, Exhausted By Rising Temperatures (NPR)

… The journey north usually takes about a month, and the geese make multiple stops along the way to eat and fatten up before they lay their eggs, says Bart Nolet of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and the University of Amsterdam.But that pattern of migration is changing, as rapidly rising temperatures have led to earlier springs in the Arctic.