Lilac Hills

HEAR OUR INTERVIEW: MARK JACKSON, NO ON MEASURE B

 

October 25,  2016 (San Diego's  East  County)--  Measure B on the  countywide ballot was paid for by  a  developer.  Accretive Development wants voters to approve Lilac  Hills, a massive,  master-planned community the size of Del Mar in rural Valley Center. 

Why should voters in East County and elsewhere in San Diego care?  First, because taxpayers countywide could wind up footing part of the bill and second,  because if Measure B passes, developers of other controversial  projects could similarly seek to bypass state enviornmental review and the county plannning process.  That's why major environmental groups such as  Sierra Club, Save Our Forests and Ranchlands, and Cleveland Natoinal Forest Foundation are all opposed to the ballot proposition.

Hear our interview with Mark Jackson from the No on Measure B committee, originally aired on  our show on KNSJ radio, by clicking the audio link.

Audio: 

SUPERVISORS TO VOTE OCT. 14 ON LILAC HILLS RANCH: OPPONENTS ASK HORN TO RECUSE SELF DUE TO CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

East County News Service

September 26, 2015 (Valley Center) – Supervisors are poised to vote October 14 on whether to approve an amendment to the County’s General Plan to allow construction of Lilac Hills, a project that includes 1,746 homes plus commercial development on 608 acres in rural Valley Center. Current zoning allows only 110 homes on the site.

If approved, the project could set a precedent to waive General Plan requirements countywide.

Now the Cleveland National Forest Foundation has called on Supervisor Bill Horn to recuse himself due to apparent conflicts of interest involving potential increased property value of land he owns nearby.  Horn has asked the state's Fair Political Practices Commission for a legal opinion on whether he must recuse himself, after another activist sent a letter of complaint to the FPPC.

LILAC HILLS: WHY PLUNK A CITY IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE?

 

Originally Published on the ECOreport

By Roy L Hales

On October 14th, or possibly the 28th, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors will decide if they should rip up the dreams of a rural community so a developer can get a lot of money. As County Planning commissioners Peder Norby and Michael Beck recently pointed out, if the Lilac Hills project goes forward it will destroy 13 years of work, and close to $20 million, that went into San Diego County’s General Plan.

The project spreads across 608 acres in the Valley Center area. There are currently 16 “dwelling units” and a total of  just 110 are allowed under current zoning. Accretive Investments wants to build 1,786 units over the course of a decade. This would support a larger population that the city of Del Mar. Why plunk a city in the middle of nowhere?