bees

COMMON PESTICIDE NEONICOTINOID DAMAGES HONEY BEES’ ABILITY TO FLY, UCSD FINDS

 

By Chris Jennewein

Reprinted from Times of San Diego, a member of the San Diego Online News Association

April 26, 2017 (San Diego) -- Biologists at UC San Diego have demonstrated for the first time that a widely-used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of honey bees to fly.

The finding raising concerns about how pesticides affect their capacity to pollinate and the long-term effects on the health of honey bee colonies.

GET THE BUZZ ON BEES AND HONEY MAY 13 IN LAKESIDE

 

East County News Service

April 23, 2017 (Lakeside) – Bees are amazing and essential--and they’re vanishing.  On May 13 at 11 a.m., third generation beekeeper Richard Edwords will be speaking at the Lakeside River Park Conservancy, 12108 Industry Road in Lakeside.

SAVING HIVES AND LIVES: BEES' RELOCATION BETTER THAN THEIR DESTRUCTION

 

By Ted Salois, Helix Water District

October 11, 2016 (San Diego's East County) - Jesse Adcock knows bees.  He moves among them with the ease and acceptance of a good friend—because he is one, even though the bees don’t know it.  

His “self-taught” expertise with the busy, buzzing, honey-makers tells him how to approach a sizable nest while remaining safe.  His choice of clothing--t-shirt, shorts and sandals--shows confidence in his judgment.  “When I first arrive at a hive, I listen to the sound the colony is making,” Adcock said.  “I can tell by the tone whether they’re angry or likely to become aggressive.”  

COUNTY RESPONDS TO CONCERNS OVER IMPACT ON BEES FROM SPRAYING TO CONTROL ZIKA VIRUS

 

By Miriam Raftery

September 8, 2016 (San Diego) – Spraying chemicals to kill Aedes mosquitoes that can transmit Zika virus is being done in communities across the nation where returning travelers have been diagnosed with Zika. But a report in South Carolina of massive bee kills from aerial spraying has raised concerns over how to protect bees from poisoning while also protecting public health from the dangerous Zika virus.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE BUZZ

 

By Jonathan Goetz

Photo: Members of the San Diego Beekeeping Society at Lemon Grove City Council Meeting 5/17/16 (left to right) Carlos Richardson, Mark Kukuchek, Rebecca Wolniewicz, Daryl Hern, Neyl Montesano

May 21, 2016 (Lemon Grove) -- Lemon Grove is one step closer towards simplifying its beekeeping regulations. Half a dozen members of the San Diego Beekeeping Society gave testimony to the Lemon Grove Council on Tuesday in an attempt to address common fears about bee hives.

 “When I find an aggressive hive, I insert a new docile queen to make the hive less aggressive. Good beekeeping keeps our communities safe,” Carlos Richardson told Council members and the public.

EPA RULING ON BEE-KILLING PESTICIDE DRAWS CONTROVERSY

 

 

Top scientist claims evidence of neonicotinoids harming bees was silenced by agrochemical companies

 

By Brigitte Garcia

 

January 13, 2016 (San Diego’s East County) -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week issued a ruling that neonicotinoids used on cotton and citrus crops harm bees -- but the same pesticide used on other crops does not, Associated Press reports. Some bee experts have argued that neonicotinoids are a major cause of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). The controversial statement pleased neither environmentalists concerned over bee declines, nor Bayer, the maker of neonicotinoids.

HERE'S THE BUZZ: BEEKEEPING BOOST APPROVED BY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

 

 

County News Service

September 16, 2015 (San Diego)--The San Diego County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved new rules Wednesday that will promote beekeeping and local agriculture while protecting the public. 

Supervisors approved a new “tiered” beekeeping ordinance that will allow beekeeping hobbyists and businesses to keep bees and hives closer to roads, property lines and homes in unincorporated areas — but still far enough away to keep people safe.

SCIENCE AND HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS

EARTHTALK®: ATTRACTING BEES AND BUTTERFLIES TO YOUR GARDEN

March 16, 2013 (San Diego) -- Dear EarthTalk: I’d like to have a garden that encourages bees and butterflies. What’s the best approach?                                                              

-- Robert Miller, Bakersfield, CA

Attracting bees and butterflies to a garden is a noble pursuit indeed, given that we all depend on these species and others (beetles, wasps, flies, hummingbirds, etc.) to pollinate the plants that provide us with so much of our food, shelter and other necessities of life. In fact, increased awareness of the essential role pollinators play in ecosystem maintenance—along with news about rapid declines in bee populations—have led to a proliferation of backyard “pollinator gardens” across the U.S. and beyond.

WATER CONSERVATION GARDEN 2012 WINTER/SPRING CALENDAR OF EVENTS


March Members Month, The Backyard Flock: Raising Urban Chickens, Village Aquaponics Workshops, Fall in Love with Bees!, Designing a Small Space Garden and The Spring Garden Festival. 
 
January 10, 2012 (Rancho San Diego)—The Water Conservation Garden invites the public to enjoy its 2012 winter and spring events.  Gardening classes help residents save water and money by focusing on water-smart landscaping techniques and plants.  Classes are taught by experts and topics include lawn removal, water-smart landscape design, backyard composting, irrigation design and gardening for children.  Pre-registration is required for all classes.  To enroll call 619-660-0614 x 10