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RAMONA UNIFIED'S LOOMING STRIKE: CHECKING UP

 

By Will Carless

Originally published April 30 at http://www.voiceofsandiego.org/education/article_4a75d15c-b1ef-11e2-89e1-0019bb2963f4.html

April 30, 2013 (Ramona)- -Things haven't gotten any better at the Ramona Unified School District in the few months since we last wrote about the district's budgetary woes.

Ramona is the only school district in the county to have never passed a bond measure. Last year, the district floated Proposition R, which would have raised $55 million, a chunk of which Ramona Unified could have used to pay off old loans it took out to renovate district schools in 2004. The bond failed, leaving district officials scratching their heads as to how to pay off the old debts.

PROPOSITION 30 PICKED UP A MAJOR WIN FOR EDUCATION FUNDING IN CA

By Bill Weaver

November 7, 2012 (San Diego)—Governor Jerry Brown has announced victory for Proposition 30. The ballot measure will raise income taxes on the wealthiest citizens in the state and temporarily increase the state sales tax by a quarter of a cent to fund K-12 schools, community colleges and state universities. Prop 30 is expected to raise more than $6 billion in revenue. If it had not passed, schools and colleges would have suffered significant trigger cuts in state appropriations.

PROP 38 WOULD RAISE TAXES ON ALL EARNING OVER $7,312 TO FUND EDUCATION AND REDUCE STATE’S DEBT

By Thea Skinner

October 10, 2012 (San Diego's East County)--Proposition 38 would raise income taxes to fund K-12 education.  he measure differs from Prop 30, the Governor’s education funding initiative also on the ballot, in several key ways. 

Prop 38 increases taxes on low and middle income earners as well as those with higher incomes, while Prop 30' sincome tax raise targets only the wealthy. Prop 38 imposes restrictions on how education funds can be spent. Prop 38 is limited to K-12 funding, while Prop 30 also includes community colleges. Prop 38 raises taxes over a longer time period. 

PROP 30 AIMS TO RAISE FUNDS TO STEM BUDGET CUTS IN PUBLIC EDUCATION

By Thea Skinner

Miriam Raftery also contributed to this story

October 10, 2012 (San Diego's East County)--Proposition 30 is the Schools and Safety Protection Act, also known as the temporary taxes to fund education. The measure aims to provide a stable source of funds for public education, which has seen budgets slashed severely in recent years. Local schools have seen teacher lay-offs and class sizes increase; colleges have severely cut back course offerings and some have even eliminated summer school.

Proposition 30 increases income taxes for seven years on Californian residents who earn over $250,000 a year or couples earning over $500,000 a year. It also increases sales taxes for residents of California by ¼ cent for four years. If passed, Prop 30 could raise $6 billion annually for community colleges and K-12 schools.

ALPINE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ANNOUNCES FUNDRAISING DRIVES IN WAKE OF BUDGET CUTS

 

You can help by collecting Box Tops, Campbell Soup Labels, Coke Rewards and joining Target’s Take Charge of Education program

March 27, 2011 (Alpine)--Public schools are getting hit with major budget cuts. Now, Alpine Elementary School hopes to raise its own money--with your help. 

 

“Each fundraiser brings lots of money and educational items to our school and requires minimal effort and almost no cost to you,” says spokesperson Sharmin Self, who said teachers are currently having to pay for many school supplies out of their own pockets.

 

Scroll down for details that Self provided on how you can help.

TEACHERS URGE PUBLIC: WEAR A PINK HEART TODAY TO SHOW SOME LOVE FOR EDUCATION

Teachers call for "pink hearts, not pink slips"

February 14, 2011 (San Diego’s East County) -- The American Federation of Teachers is asking people to wear a pink heart today, Valentine’s Day, to show support for public education.

BUDGET SITUATION “BLEAK” SAYS LMSV SUPERINTENDENT

 

  • Sixth graders may be moved back to elementary schools
  •  60 teachers apt to lose jobs
  • California lags behind rest of nation in per-pupil K-12 spending--and that's before next round of budget slashing

By Miriam Raftery
February 2, 2011 (La Mesa) – Speaking to a packed audience at the La Mesa Spring Valley District headquarters yesterday, Superintendent Brian Marshall grimly informed parents and teachers, “The budget situation is bleak.”
 
He said the District has held off making severe cuts up until now, dipping into reserves in hopes that the financial outlook would improve. But with another round of budget cuts from the state, tough choices can no longer be avoided.

GUHSD TO HOLD SPECIAL MEETING ON BUDGET FEB. 3

 

January 31, 2011 (El Cajon) – The Grossmont Union High School District has announced that it will hold a special budget study session on Thursday, February 3 at 2:30 p.m.

 

The meeting, which is open to the public, will be held at the Instructional Resources Meeting room at 301 North Mollison in El Cajon.

BLOCK'S BILL TO RESTORE SPECIAL EDUCATION FUNDS NOW ON GOVERNOR'S DESK

August 23, 2010 (Sacramention)--Assemblymember Marty Block (AD-78) announced today that AB 184 has cleared the Legislature and is now awaiting action by the Governor. The bill prevents the California Department of Education from requiring school districts to repay the state for Special Disabilities Adjustment funding that they received in the last fiscal year and already used to teach special-needs students in their classrooms.

STATE FUNDING CUTS FORCE SEVERE SUMMER COURSE REDUCTIONS

 

 

Nearly 5,000 students on waiting lists due to 50% cutback in classes;
veterans on G.I. bill and students on financial aid risk losing funds


East County News Service

June 21, 2010 (El Cajon) – Higher education funding cuts due to the California state budget crisis have forced Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District to severely reduce summer course sections, despite growing demands for classes from students seeking to retrain for new careers and complete general education requirements to transfer to four-year universities and colleges.

 

Despite efforts to keep budget cuts from harming students, the colleges have been forced to slash summer offerings by 50%.

BLOCK’S BILL TO RESTORE LOCAL STUDENT GUARANTEED ADMISSIONS AT SDSU SET FOR HEARING WED. MAY 12

 

 Update: This bill was sent to the suspension file, which likely means it will not win passage this session.

May 11, 2010 (San Diego) – San Diego State University (SDSU) president Stephen Weber sparked campus-wide protests when he announced elimination of guaranteed admissions for local students who meet California State University (CSU) requirements, dashing dreams of a college education for many who can't afford to live away from home.

 

Now Assemblyman Marty Block (D-Lemon Grove) has authored AB 2401, a bill that would mandate that all CSU campuses give priority to local students. The measure is set for hearing tomorrow in the Assembly Appropriations Committee--and backers are seeking public support.

MEASURE SIGNED BY PRESIDENT INCREASES COLLEGE ACCESS & AFFORDABILITY

  

Raises Pell Grants, eases loan repayments, & funds community colleges

Changes paid for by eliminating $68 billion in fees to banks

 

By Miriam Raftery

April 3, 2010 (San Diego’s East County) – Most Americans don’t realize that the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act signed into law on March 30th by President Barack Obama affects more than the health care industry.  It also brings sweeping change to the federal student loan program. Obama termed this “one of the most significant investments in higher education since the G.I. Bill.”

Under the new law, the federal government will stop paying fees to private banks to act as middlemen on loans to students. The measure will save the U.S. government nearly $68 million over the next 11 years—money that will be invested in more Pell Grants made directly to students.  The new law will also make it easier for students to repay loans after graduating. In addition, $2 billion will be invested in community colleges for education and career training programs.

GUHSD BOARD CALLS SPECIAL MEETING ON BUDGET THURS. JAN. 28

 

January 24, 2010 (El Cajon) -- Grossmont Union High School District's board of trustees will hold a special meeting this Thursday, January 28th on budget issues. A closed session will be held at 5 pm, followed by a public session at 6 pm.

SDSU CUTS ENROLLMENT, CHANGES ADMISSION & TRANSFER STUDENT POLICIES: ANNOUNCEMENT DRAWS CRITICISM

September 23, 2009 – In response to “devastating budget cuts”, San Diego State University President Stephen L. Weber announced that SDSU will cut enrollment by 10.8%, or 4,588 undergraduate students. In addition, the school will make changes to its admissions policy for incoming fall 2010 freshmen and transfer students. The announcement has sparked concerns and criticisms from community leaders.
 

“These changes are a direct result of devastating state budget cuts of $571 million to the California State University System and SDSU,” Weber wrote in an e-mail sent to faculty members yesterday.

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