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FOREST SERVICE, BLM ISSUE PLAN TO ELIMINATE FERAL PIGS WITH HELICOPTER HUNTING, TRAPS AND DOGS

Public has until July 18 to submit comments

June 24, 2012 (San Diego)--Cleveland National Forest (CNF) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have released an Environmental Assessment (EA) for feral pig management on public lands in San Diego, Riverside and Orange Counties, as well as on the Capitan Grande Indian Reservation.

Feral pigs, which are not native to our region, have caused extensive damage by rooting that destroys riparian waterways, habitat and forage for wildlife. The plan includes 600,000 acres of public lands, including many in East County.

ANIMAL RIGHTS ACTIVISTS PROTEST PLAN TO ERADICATE WILD PIGS LOCALLY

 

April 1, 2012 (San Diego’s East County) – Activists have voiced outrage over the U.S. Forest Service’s announced  plans to use helicopters to shoot  the growing feral pig population running wild across rural East County. Now, a grassroots organization known as Save Our Wild Pigs Action Committee (SOWPAC) has announced plans to rescue the imperiled swine.

“This is a ham-handed and heartless scheme to eradicate these animals,” said Wanda Hogg, SOWPAC spokesperson, who asked her her face not be shown.  “SOWPAC’s mission is to rescue these wild pigs instead.”

EAST OF THE LINE: FIRING BACK AT BORDER FIRE, ROOTING OUT WILD PIGS, & A GARDEN PARTY IN POTRERO

By Billie Jo Jannen

 

Firefighters shoot back at border fire

 

September 29, 2010 (San Diego’s East County) -- A Mexican fire that threatened the border area between Castle Rock and Bell Valley over the weekend was turned back handily at the border fence Sunday night by a line of firefighters armed with a variety of ignition devices.

 

That’s right—I said ignition devices.

RUNNING WILD IN EAST COUNTY: FERAL PIGS A GROWING PROBLEM

 

March 31, 2010 (San Diego’s East County) – It's hog heaven in East County. Wild boars and sows have startled horses, hikers and residents in Alpine, Ramona, Poway and other backcountry areas in recent months. A Fish and Game expert estimates there may be as many as 200 to 300 feral hogs rooting their way across East County, the Union-Tribune reported yesterday.

 

But while bacon-on-the-hoof may provide tempting targets for hunters, the non-native species poses threats to agriculture, livestock and the environment, also raising potential human health and safety issues.

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