Native American

HEAR OUR INTERVIEW WITH PAULA MARGULIES, AUTHOR OF BOOKS WITH NATIVE AMERICAN THEMES

 

 

By Miriam Raftery

November 20, 2014 (San Diego’s East County) – As part of our coverage of Native American Heritage Month,  East County Magazine Show’s Bookshelf host Reina Menasche interviewed local writer Paula Margulies. She is the author of Favorite Daughter, Part I, a story about Pocahontas told from a Native American point of view.  She has also written a novel, Coyote Moon, set on the Pala Indian Reservation here in San Diego’s inland region.

Listen to our interview with Paula Margulies, originally aired on KNSJ radio, now online here: http://kiwi6.com/file/rax9zn8o2m

ROY COOK, AMERICAN INDIAN LOCAL HERO AWARD RECIPIENT, HONORS PAST AND FUTURE GENERATIONS

 

By Leon Thompson

November 24, 2014 – (San Diego County) - “November is recognized as National American Indian Heritage Month. America's first peoples have endured, and they remain a vital cultural, political, social, and moral presence. Tribal America has brought to this great country certain human values and political ideas that have become ingrained in the spirit of the United States of America.”

These are the words of Roy Cook who was selected as a 2014 American Indian Heritage Month Local Hero by KPBS and Union Bank.  Roy has a deep understanding and knowledge of Native American history and culture.  

A tribal writer, Native American singer, California Indian artist and teacher, Cook’s earliest memories are of people on Santa Ysabel Reservation in San Diego County.

KPBS AND UNION BANK HONOR NATIVE AMERICAN HEROES

 

 

Photos: Roy Cook (left) and Dr. Daniel Calac (right)

 

 

 

 

East County News Service

November 13, 2013 (San Diego)--KPBS and Union Bank  are honoring two inspiring individuals in honor of American Indian Heritage Month through their Local Heroes program, which pays tribute to exemplary leaders who are making a difference and enriching the lives of others by improving their community, region and the world at large. 

The 2014 honorees for American Indian Heritage Month are Dr. Daniel Calac and Roy Cook.

LEMON GROVE MURAL WINS AWARD FROM GOVERNOR BROWN

 

By Miriam Raftery

October 2, 2014 (Lemon Grove)—An elaborate five-panel mural depicting the history of Lemon Grove has been awarded the Governor’s Historic Preservation Award for 2014.  A letter from the Governor’s office sent to the Lemon Grove Historical Society, which commissioned the project, called it “an exceptional example of historic preservation efforts on behalf of California’s cultural heritage.”

PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE

 

By Grey Feathers

Barona Cultural Center, Wildcat Canyon Road, Lakeside

July 26, 2014 (Barona) - To document, describe and explain the complex relationships between cultures and the uses of plants is the practice of ethnobotany.  This includes the use of plants as food, clothing, currency, ritual, medicine, dye, construction, cosmetics and more.The Barona Cultural Center and Museum and the Barona Indian Charter School have partnered together to practice ethnobotany.

BILL TO INCREASE PROTECTION OF NATIVE AMERICAN SACRED SITES PASSES ASSEMBLY, BUT KEY LOOPHOLE COULD LIMIT ITS EFFECT

 

By Miriam Raftery

June 30, 2013 (Sacramento) – A measure to require that developers consult with Native American tribes before initiating projects that affect tribal sacred sites and cultural resources has unanimously passed the state Assembly by a 56-0 vote. The bill now heads to the State Senate.

The approval of AB 52, authored by Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles), came despite opposition from the California Chamber of Commerce, which called the measure a “job killer.”

The bill strengthens consultation standards with tribes under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), including impacts to tribal sites among the environmental impacts that must be weighed.  But the bill also contains a provision that could allow tribal concerns to be ignored if any one of a list of other benefits is found to outweigh tribal concerns.

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE COMMISSION HEARING ON OCOTILLO ISSUES SET FOR APRIL 22 IN SAN DIEGO

 

By Miriam Raftery

April 12, 2013 (San Diego’s East County) – The California Native American Heritage (CNAH) Commission will hold a hearing in San Diego on Monday, April 22 at 11 a.m. The hearing will focus on results of an NAHC investigation into local tribes' allegations that the federal government failed to protect Native American cultural resources at the Ocotillo Express Wind Facility site.

The hearing will be in the State of California Building, 1350 Front Street, San Diego 92101 (between A and Ash Streets).  

A hearing previously set for February was cancelled without explanation. The CNAH had issued a  draft report in support of claims by the Viejas Band of the Kumeyaay Indians and Quechan Indian Nation that the Bureau of Land Management failed in its duty to protect cultural resources, including human remains and sacred sites, at the Ocotillo project.  The draft staff report detailed a disturbing pattern by the BLM, Pattern Energy and a project archaeology consultant of ignoring tribal concerns and failing in its duty to protect cultural resources. 

READER’S EDITORIAL: GREGORY LANDFILL – IT IS TIME WE LISTENED

 

By Roy Hales

http://www.sandiegolovesgreen.com/articles/gregory-landfill-it-is-time-we-listened/

February 9, 2013 (San Diego)--An editorial, written in defense of the proposed Gregory Landfill, recently complained that, “…the Pala decided to claim the entire mountain is a sacred site.” I sometimes wonder how much the people who do, or say, things like that know of their own ancestry? Without resorting to a genealogist, can they tell us where their paternal great, great grandfather lived? How about their maternal great, great, grandmother?

ECM WORLD WATCH: GLOBAL AND NATIONAL NEWS

January 10, 2013 (San Diego’s East County)--ECM World Watch helps you be an informed citizen about important issues globally and nationally. As part of our commitment to reflect all voices and views, we include links to a wide variety of news sources representing a broad spectrum of political, religious, and social views. Top world and U.S. headlines include:

U.S.

WORLD

Read more for excerpts and links to full stories.

PASSAGES: DENNIS AVNER, STALKING CAT, DEAD AT 54

November 14, 212 (Guatay) – Dennis Avner, a former Guatay resident also known by his Native American name, Stalking Cat,  was found dead on November 5 in Tonopah, Nevada. Avner was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for the most body modifications to resemble an animal, following numerous surgeries, piercings and tattoos to resemble a tiger. 

HOUSE BILL WOULD MAKE IT COSTLY FOR PLAINTIFFS WHO SUE TO BLOCK ENERGY PROJECTS ON TRIBAL LANDS

 

 

Bill would also ban public from accessing environmental impacts of tribal projects

By Miriam Raftery

July 5, 2012 (Washington D.C.) –The Native American Energy Act, HR 3973, has been approved by the House Natural Resources Committee. The bill, which seeks to remove “bureaucratic obstacles” to energy production on tribal lands, would also severely impede residents, environmentalists or even neighboring tribes who file lawsuits to stop tribal energy projects.

EIGHT TRIBAL NATIONS MOURN LOSSES AT OCOTILLO WIND SITE

 

 
By Miriam Raftery
 
June 24, 2012 -- A sliver of moon and a spangle of stars shone down on the Ocotillo desert last night, where representatives from eight tribal nations joined in ceremonies to honor their ancestors.  Hundreds of people from across the southwestern U.S. came to mourn the desecration of Native American sacred lands, cremation sites and the natural environment that is now occurring on public land. 
 
As twilight melted into darkness across the shifting sands and jagged ridgelines, the night’s silence was broken only by the whistling of the wind and the cadence of ancient Native American songs unchanged for the past 10,000 years. But that way of life—and the peaceful presence of this place--may soon be gone forever.  

FORMER CHARGER HANK BAUER TO HOST NEXT GENERATIONS GALA AND GOLF TOURNAMENT

 
May 25, 2012 (Lakeside)– Celebrating 10 years of service to the Tribal communities of Southern California, Inter Tribal Sports (ITS) ambassadors Bill Walton (NBA Hall of Fame) and Lorenzo Neal (NFL All-Pro) invite San Diegans to join former San Diego Charger Hank Bauer at the NeXt Generations Gala and Golf Tournament at Barona Creek Golf Course in Lakeside on June 29.

BRING YOUR TREASURES TO THE “MUSEUM ROADSHOW” AT HERITAGE OF THE AMERICAS MUSEUM OCT. 29

October 23, 2011 (Rancho San Diego) -- On Saturday, October 29, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., the museum will host Craig P. Helm Sr., certified appraiser and authenticator, who specializes in Native American, pre-Columbian, antique pictures, guns, western memorabilia, and Asian artifacts.

The Heritage of the Americas Museum is located on the campus of Cuyamaca College in Rancho San Diego.  Admission to the museum and parking will be free that day.
 

ANTHONY PICO, SWORN IN AS NEW VIEJAS LEADER, PLEDGES NATION-BUILDING

 

February 11, 2011 (Alpine) – “What’s my vision? Two words: nation building,” Anthony Pico, chairman of the Viejas band of Kumeyaay Indians, told tribal members and guests at a swearing-in ceremony yesterday for newly elected tribal council members. View a video of Chairman Pico speaking on his vision of nation building.
 

Two weeks ago, the Viejas tribal council unanimously approved the nation-building concept. In late February, council leaders will meet with representatives from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government to begin dialogue and create a two-day workshop on defining nation-building, Pico revealed.

PRESIDENT SIGNS TRIBAL LAW AND ORDER ACT

Bill enables tribal police to enforce federal laws, protects Native American rape victims

 

4 San Diego legislators support law; Rep. Hunter votes “no”
 

By Miriam Raftery
July 30, 2010 (Washington D.C.) - “If the Tribal Law and Order Act had existed 16 years ago, my story would be very different,” Lisa Marie Lyotte said, choking back tears in a White House press conference today. In 1994, Lyotte was raped and beaten on the Sioux Indian reservation where she lived; her children witnessed the attack.  Tribal police had a suspect, but federal authorities refused to prosecute.

Native American women suffer violent crime at a rate more than triple the national average; one in three Indian women is raped during her lifetime, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Calling the situation “an assault on our national conscience,” President Barack Obama today fulfilled a campaign promise made to tribal leaders by signing the Tribal Law and Order Act into law.

CA ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE THREATENS LAWSUIT AGAINST PADRE DAM AFTER WATER DISTRICT DEFIES NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE COMMISSION, CONTINUES CONSTRUCTION AT SITE DEEMED SACRED

 

 

Community leaders testify on Viejas’ behalf, ask Padre’s water board to find alternative solution;
Viejas to ask judge on Friday to extend injunction

By Miriam Raftery

June 24, 2010 (Santee) – Improper. Disrespectful. Inappropriate. Embarassing. Those were some of the terms community leaders used at yesterday’s Padre Dam Municipal Water Board hearing to describe the Board’s refusal to halt construction at a planned reservoir and pipeline site near Lake Jennings.

 

“I’ve just come from the site,” Leon Thompson testified, drawing an audible gasp from the crow when he added that he shot video showing “desecration continuing” of areas near a circle of rocks marking grave sites.  View video here.