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SOMALI-AMERICAN CULTURAL FEST JUNE 29 IN CITY HEIGHTS

 

June 26, 2013 (San Diego) – Commemorating the 53rd anniversary of Somali independence, the 9th annual Somali American Cultural Fest will be held on Saturday, June 29 from 3 to 8 p.m. at the Market Creek Plaza at Jacob Center in City Heights, 3- 8 p.m. 

Thousands of Somali refugees and immigrants now call San Diego home.  The event will feature music, dance, poetry, a fashion show, children’s activities, food and vendor booths as well as free health screenings. The event is organized by Somali Youth United.

ARE YOU A REFUGEE FROM EAST AFRICA LIVING IN SAN DIEGO?

(Ethiopia, Somalia, Burundi, Congo, Sudan, South Sudan, Rwanda, Eritrea, Uganda, Kenya, Liberia)

October 31, 2012 (Sa Diego) -- Life in a conflict zone can be traumatizing, and moving to the U.S. doesn’t make it go away. In order to develop better services for the local East African community, we need your help.

If you are 18 years or older, please come at one of the times listed below and complete a questionnaire about trauma.  Each participant will be given $15.00.

BENEFIT TONIGHT IN SAN DIEGO TO HELP STARVING PEOPLE IN SOMALIA

 

August 12, 2011 (San Diego) -- Somali Youth League of San Diego in collaboration with the American Relief Agency for the Horn of Africa (ARAHA), will be hosting a benefit dinner tonight to help address the urgent humanitarian needs in Southern Somalia, where millions of people are in need of immediate help due to severe drought.

 

The dinner will be held at the East African Community and Cultural Center located at 4061 Fairmount Ave, San Diego, CA 92015 from 7-9 p.m. Cost is $45 at the door, or $40 with advance reservation. Donations are welcome even if you can't attend.

ALONE IN A STRANGE LAND: AFRICAN ASYLEES TELL THEIR STORIES


An East County Magazine Special Report

 

ECM conducted exclusive interviews with people who fled war-torn Somalia and were granted asylum in the U.S. Fearing retribution against family members still in Somalia, the asylees agreed to speak out under condition that their identities be protected. The stories below are real, though the names are pseudonyms. Their tales describe dramatic round-the-world journeys to reach America, hardships endured on the road and inside U.S. detention facilities, as well as hopes for the future as they start new lives through Project Refuge in San Diego.  

By Miriam Raftery

February 17, 2011 (San Diego’s East County) – Aisha comes from a rural area near Mogadishu in Somalia. “I couldn’t take it anymore,” she said of the fighting and war-torn conditions that led her to flee her homeland.

PROJECT REFUGE: ROTARY CLUBS TEAM UP WITH SOMALI FAMILY SERVICES TO SPONSOR SAFE HAVEN FOR ASYLEES

By Miriam Raftery

“We want you to have a good start in America, and for the rest of your lives.” – Dory Beatrice, president of La Jolla Golden Triangle Rotary Club, speaking to Somali women at Project Refuge
 

February 17, 2011 (San Diego) – Dory Beatrice felt shocked to learn that people who fled persecution and have been granted asylum in America are being released on the streets of San Diego with no funds, no information on resources, and no place to go.

 

So she worked with local Rotary chapters to raise funds and open Project Refuge, a transitional housing program in partnership with Somali Family Services that now assists asylees who have no family or friends here to help them.

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