Kumeyaay

ATKINS BILLS TO PROTECT SAN DIEGO RIVER, FUND AFFORDABLE HOUSING ADVANCE IN LEGISLATURE

 

View a video on the San Diego River Conservancy’s report to the Legislature

March 18, 2017 (Sacramento) -- This week, two bills authored by Sen. Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego) cleared key policy committees and moved on to the Senate Appropriations Committee for consideration. One wil help enhance portions of the San Diego River in East County. The other provides funding to build affordable housing.

SYCUAN OPENS CULTURAL RESOURCE CENTER AND MUSEUM

 

Centralized collection of Kumeyaay artifacts, curated museum pieces and extensive scholarly collection housed for research, education and outreach

Source: Sycuan

December 23, 2016 (Sycuan Indian Reservation) -- Initiated with traditional Kumeyaay Bird Singers and Dancers, native blessings and a traditional sage smudging purification, the Sycuan Tribe unveiled the Sycuan Cultural Resource Center and Museum to a large crowd and rave reviews earlier this month.  The new facility centralizes and secures an enormous amount of ancient Kumeyaay artifacts, museum quality collections, and a vast array of scholarly research featuring the famous “Shipek Collection” of Kumeyaay archives.

KUMEYAAY PROTEST “DESECRATION” AT NAVY SEAL BASE

 

By Miriam Raftery

Photo by Ozzie Monge

September 1,2016 (San Diego’s East County) –  Native Americans held a protest Wednesday outside theNavy’s new SEAL training center on Coronado over desecration of  an area  where  ancient Indian remains were found. 

The 12 tribes of the Kumeyaay Nation have asked the Navy to move the construction boundary to preserve the site where tribal members believe more remains are likely located, but so far the Navy has refused. 

“To us, the sight of those machines brutally ripping our ancestors from the ground is no different than it would be for those very same Navy personnel to watch bulldozers rip through Arlington National Cemetery, scattering the bodies of fallen soldiers carelessly under the metal treads,” Cynthia Parada, Councilwoman of the La Posta Band of Mission Indians, wrote on a Facebook page for the Save Our Ancestors from Desecration event.

SUPERVISORS APPROVE AGREEMENT WITH JAMUL TRIBE OVER CASINO IMPACTS MITIGATION

 

By Leon Thompson

April 22, 2016 (Jamul) - The San Diego County Board of Supervisors has voted to approve a Memorandum of Understanding with the Jamul Indian Village of California.  The agreement will memorialize negotiations regarding the construction and operation of the tribes Hollywood Casino Jamul set to open this summer.  The agreement passed on a 3-1 vote, with Vice Chairwoman Dianne Jacob opposed and Supervisor Greg Cox absent.

TRIBAL MEMBERS SPEAK OUT TO PRESERVE KUMEYAAY LANGUAGE

By Miriam Raftery

June 25, 2015 (San Diego’s East County) – Only about 100 fluent speakers of the Kuyemaay dialect remain -- and most of thoe are in Mexico, Margaret Field, a professor of American Indian Studies at San Diego State University told the San Diego Union-Tribune. She added, “All indigenous languages around the world are endangered, in that they could disappear within a generation or two.”

But here in San Diego’s East County, local Native American tribal members are making efforts to keep their language alive.

COWLES MTN. WINTER SOLSTICE WALKS DEC. 20-22

 

December 15, 2014 (San Diego’s East County) - The Mission Trails Regional Park Trail Guides will lead pre-dawn hikes to the area of the solstice observatory on Cowles Mountain on the 20th and 22nd of December. The Canyoneers of the San Diego Natural History Museum will lead the hike on the 21st.

HEART OF GOLD, NERVES OF STEEL: KUMEYAAY ELDER CHARLIE BROWN

 

By Miriam Raftery and Leon Thompson

Photo: Charlie Brown, right, honored as a Healthcare Hero in 2009 for his work with the Burn Institute

November 14, 2014 (Alpine) – It takes courage to jump out of an airplane into a raging forest fire—and a big heart to work on behalf of burn victims and other charitable causes.  Kumeyaay elder Charlie Brown has done all of these things and more.  He’s been honored as a Healthcare Hero, nominated by the Burn Institute. He's also lived through tumultous changes that swept across Native American reservations in East County as a result of tribal gaming.

This month, he sat down with East County Magazine Tribal Beat reporter Leon Thompson for an exclusive interview, reflecting on his career as a U.S. Forest Service hot shot, his philanthropic efforts, and the dramatic changes that the Kumeyaay nation in San Diego County has seen as a result of Indian gaming. 

Listen online now to our exclusive interview with Charlie Brown, originally aired earlier this month on the East County Magazine Radio Show on KNSJ with our Tribal Beat host, Leon Thompson:

Part 1:

http://k001.kiwi6.com/hotlink/0w48zx7ox0/TribalBeatCharlie_Brown_Part_1-revised_complete.mp3

Part 2:

http://k001.kiwi6.com/hotlink/z11socps5p/TribalBeat-CharleBrown-Part2-final.mp3

NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISTS SOUGHT FOR ARTWORK ON ANZA HISTORIC TRAIL: DEC. 31 DEADLINE

 

November 6, 2014 (San Diego's East County) - The California Indian Heritage Center Foundation is calling for Native American artists to produce new visual artwork that shares the Native Californian perspective of the Anza Expedition of 1775-76 and its impact. The visual art will enter the collection of the California Indian Heritage Center Foundation for display and interpretation. It will also be used by the National Park Service for education and interpretation of multiple perspectives of the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail.

ANCIENT KUMEYAAY ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIND AT ECO-SUBSTATION SITE

 

 

By Miriam Raftery

August 30, 2014 (Jacumba Hot Springs)—Two agave roasting pits  found recently in Jacumba Hot Springs have been carbon-dated, indicating Kumeyaay Native American occupation in the Jacumba region dates back at least 9,000 years.  Termed “an astounding recent archaeological find” by the Imperial Valley Desert Museum in Ocotillo, the agave roasting pits were unearthed during construction of SDG&E’s ECO substation project in San Diego’s East County.

Howard Cook, chair of Jacumba Hot Springs Sponsor Group (the town's advisory planning board) believes the find should have impacts on future develoment projects pending in the area. 

“This is highly relevant to the proposed Jacumba Solar project located next door and sharing roads with the under construction Eco project,” he told East County Magazine. “Certainly this calls for a cultural monitor and perhaps some preliminary excavating of the proposed site by [an] historical society and Native American historical/cultural experts."

PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE

 

By Grey Feathers

Barona Cultural Center, Wildcat Canyon Road, Lakeside

July 26, 2014 (Barona) - To document, describe and explain the complex relationships between cultures and the uses of plants is the practice of ethnobotany.  This includes the use of plants as food, clothing, currency, ritual, medicine, dye, construction, cosmetics and more.The Barona Cultural Center and Museum and the Barona Indian Charter School have partnered together to practice ethnobotany.

YOUR SONG, YOUR STORY: SYMPHONY OFFERS FREE PERFORMANCES IN LOCAL COMMUNITIES

 

Programs July 15 at Kroc Theatre, July 16 at Embarcadero Marina Park South, and July 17 at Lincoln High School

By Miriam Raftery

Concert details and RSVP for free tickets:  www.yoursongyourstory.org

Listen Friday at 5 p.m. on KNSJ 89.1 FM to our radio interview with Leonor Perez, artistic projects manager, San Diego Symphony

July 10, 2014 (San Diego)—The San Diego Symphony teams up with local artists and Academy Award-winner Bill Conti (composer of the themes for Rocky and James Bond movies) for a series of free performances in disadvantaged communities. “Your song, your story” is the culmination of a year of outreach in which the Symphony received over 300 submissions from local artists, chose 18 and asked Conti to create a composition inspired by the works celebrating diverse cultural perspectives.

The shows highlight the diversity of San Diego neighborhoods – and each will include a block party celebration complete with free food and entertainment. Performers include many East County groups, such as the Kumeyaay Youth Bird Singers, Soaring Eagles, and Luay Yousif of St. Peters Chaldean Catholic Church.

SYCUAN AWARDED 2014 EMMY FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN TELEVISION

Read our prior story about the debut of Sycuan's documentary

Hear our exclusive interview with Sycuan Chairman Daniel Tucker during the debut: click here



June 30, 2014 (El Cajon) – Sycuan’s “Our People. Our Culture. Our History” film has been honored with a 2014 EMMY® Award, Pacific Southwest region, for outstanding achievement in television. The acclaimed documentary has also received a prestigious Gold CINDY® Award in the Regional Broadcast category and a Special Achievement Award for Direction and Production Design.

The 48-minute program tells the story of Sycuan and the Kumeyaay Nation through the words of its people - Tribal elders, Council leaders, family members and the next generation. Augmented by incisive observations from Native American historians and a range of subject matter experts, this documentary follows the incredible 12,500 year journey of a People who has survived against overwhelming odds to become a sovereign, prosperous nation who continues to honor its past while building its future and positively impacting their community.

PRESERVING THE PAST AT CENTRO CULTURAL AND KUMEYAAY MUSEUM IN TECATE

 

By Mimi Pollack

July 1, 2014 (Tecate)--There are only 70 to 80 people left in Baja California who speak Kumeyaay, according to Michael Wilken Robertson, an anthropologist who also specializes in ethno-botany. When Wilken-Robertson first started his journey studying the indigenous people of Baja California, he was told there were no indigenous cultures there.  

He believed something had to be done to preserve these ancient cultures and traditions before they were lost, especially those of the Kumeyaay [Kumiai] people. The Kumiai are the indigenous people on both sides of the border, starting from Carlsbad on the United States side, down to the Santo Tomas Valley in Baja California, Mexico.

The Museo Communitario de Tecate [Tecate Community Museum] and the Kumiai wing is a good first step towards documenting the life and history of these people. It is part of the Centro Cultural [Cultural Center] in Tecate, Baja California.

BUILDING A FUTURE BY HONORING THE PAST: DOCUMENTARY REVEALS POIGNANT HISTORY OF THE KUMEYAAY NATION

 

To hear our exclusive interview with Sycuan Chairman Daniel Tucker, click here

By Miriam Raftery

November 14, 2013 (El Cajon ) – History books in California schools teach a view of our past that focuses on Spanish missionaries , conquistadors and other Europeans while omitting the Kumeyaay Native American people who  had lived here for thousands of generations before the first settlers came.  A new documentary produced by the Sycuan band of the Kumeyaay nation aims to change that.

Our People, Our Culture, Our History  premiered this week and will be distributed to local schools.  The film reveals a side of San Diego history that most area residents have never been taught—the exploitation and near extermination of the Kumeyaay people.  This powerful film also documents a triumph of the human spirit, detailing the Sycuan band’s struggle to survive and thrive as a new generation rediscovers a heritage nearly lost.

SYCUAN TO PREMIERE POWERFUL YET POIGNANT DOCUMENTARY



Production Details Kumeyaay History and Sycuan’s Evolution in the Region



November 6, 2013 (El Cajon)-- On Friday morning, Sycuan will debut a historical documentary that chronicles its 12,000-year existence in the present-day San Diego/Northern Baja region. It’s taken 16 months to produce and features local Native American anthropologists, historians and curators who help weave and trace the Kumeyaay ancestry. It also contains biographical accounts that make it an even more compelling and thought provoking piece.

“It really shows our history from a perspective that most people have never heard of, it goes beyond anything in textbooks and accounts ever written or told about the Kumeyaay and Sycuan,” said Daniel Tucker, Chairman of the Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation.

CALTRANS BUILDING TO BE DEMOLISHED AT SITE OF ANCIENT KUMEYAAY VILLAGE

 

By Paul  Kruze

July 23, 2013 (San Diego's East County) -- After nearly a decade of wrangling between the State of California and Caltrans, Old Town State Park is set to be expanded and revitalized with approval of the new California state budget, which includes $436,000 in bond money allocated to demolish the old Caltrans building on Taylor Street.  Most significantly, the abandoned 115,735 square foot Caltrans building sits on top of an ancient Kumeyaay village which allegedly dates back to 500 AD, and which was once a thriving Mexican settlement.

IDLE NO MORE MOVEMENT FOR NATIVE RIGHTS, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS REACHES SAN DIEGO

 

Speakers see parallels between destruction by energy companies in our region to environmental degradation, erosion of protections for people around the world

By Miriam Raftery

January 31, 2013 (San Diego) – Idle No More, a movement for the rights of indigenous people and environmental protections that began in Canada, has spread around the world and has now taken root here in San Diego.  Earlier this month,  members of local Native American tribes met convened at a forum sponsored by Activist San Diego to share their concerns and invite all people to join the movement.

“We must stand up to unite, to respect the Mother Earth,” Dennis  Alto, a Viejas tribal member, said.  “We are not just addressing the red nations; we are addressing all people.”

The Idle No More movement arose in Canada as a protest against the Canadian Government passing bills which enabled the government to control lands reserved for native people and reduce environmental protections for lakes and rivers.  Tar sands, pollution from mining and other sources are polluting  the waters and the lands.  Tribal members draw parallels to what is happening in the U.S., where mining, dams, and now large-scale wind and solar projects are ravaging the environment , destroying cultural resources and the way of life for many indigenous Americans.

KUMEYAAY PLANT LORE AND USES TOUR DEC. 1

November 29, 2012 (El Cajon) – A Native Plant Garden Tour will take place in the Water Conservation Garden at Cuyamaca College, 12122 Cuyamaca College Dr. West, El Cajon on December 1 at 10:30 a.m.  The Native Plant tour, guided by Garden Docent, Jan Tubiolo, explores the lifestyle of the Kumeyaay Indians in southern California and the tremendous role native plants played in every aspect of their lives.

HARPIST MAIR RATHBURN TO PERFORM CENTENNIAL CONCERT AT EL CAJON LIBRARY AUG. 12

 
July 30, 2012 (El Cajon) -- Singer and harpist Mair Rathburn brings her musical fun in vintage costume to the El Cajon Library, 201 E. Douglas Av, in a family friendly concert Sunday, August 12, at 2 p.m. The free concert is part of the San Diego County Library Acoustic Showcase series, and is sponsored by the Friends of the El Cajon Library.
 
Rathburn is a historical interpreter at the Cosmopolitan Hotel in San Diego's Old Town State Park, so it piqued her interest when, at a previous Acoustic Showcase concert, she saw the library's mural depicting the history of El Cajon.  As the year 2012 celebrates the Centennial of the City of El Cajon, Rathburn was inspired to return to the library with a musical, historical version of the mural.

ANTHONY PICO, SWORN IN AS NEW VIEJAS LEADER, PLEDGES NATION-BUILDING

 

February 11, 2011 (Alpine) – “What’s my vision? Two words: nation building,” Anthony Pico, chairman of the Viejas band of Kumeyaay Indians, told tribal members and guests at a swearing-in ceremony yesterday for newly elected tribal council members. View a video of Chairman Pico speaking on his vision of nation building.
 

Two weeks ago, the Viejas tribal council unanimously approved the nation-building concept. In late February, council leaders will meet with representatives from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government to begin dialogue and create a two-day workshop on defining nation-building, Pico revealed.

VIEJAS, PADRE WATER AND NATIVE HERITAGE COMMISSION AGREE TO FURTHER CULTURAL ASSESSMENT AT SACRED SITE

 

November 17, 2010 (Alpine) – The Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians and Padre Dam Municipal Water District today announced an agreement to conduct further tribal cultural resource investigations at a proposed development site which has been declared a sanctified Native American burial ground and ceremonial site.

PASSAGES: ANNA PRIETO SANDOVAL, SYCUAN’S FIRST WOMAN TRIBAL CHAIR

 

Sandoval helped lead tribe from poverty to prosperity

 

“Our people need to understand the importance of honoring our ancestors and our traditions and to never forget the hardship and depravation our people went through to get where we are today.” –Anna Prieto Sandoval
 

By Miriam Raftery
 

November 7, 2010 (El Cajon)—Anna Prieto Sandoval, 76, former chairman of the Sycuan band of the Kumeyaay Nation, died October 28 at her home on the Sycuan reservation from complications of diabetes. She served as Sycuan’s elected chairman from 1972 to 1990 and was a leading voice in bringing Indian gaming to the reservation, helping to create one of the most successful Indian gaming establishments in the nation. Also a historian who advocated for preservation of native traditions, she was inducted into the San Diego Women’s Hall of Fame in March 2010.
 

FROM THE MOUNTAINS TO THE SEA, KUMEYAAY KIDS REDISCOVER THEIR HERITAGE

 

 

By Marisa Kezirian

 

Photos by Miriam Raftery
 

August 16, 2009 (La Jolla) – It was a day filled with education and excitement for Native American youngsters enrolled in Camp Heyaay Coome Kooknumch, which means “The Elders Long Ago Tell Our Stories.”

 

CAMPO BAND OF KUMEYAAY INDIANS RECEIVE STIMULUS FUNDS FOR CLEAN DRINKING WATER

 

July 15, 2009 (San Diego)--Congressman Bob Filner announced that the Campo Band of Kumeyaay Indians, along with six other Indian Tribes in California, will have improved access to vital water services through funds awarded from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, otherwise known as the stimulus bill.

 

WOW- IT'S A POW-WOW! SAT. FEB. 28 AT GROSSMONT COLLEGE

February 23, 2009 (El Cajon)--The 21st annual Grossmont College Pow-Wow, a celebration of American Indian culture, will be held on Saturday, Feb. 28, at the college's Student Center. Admission is free. The day-long event, which begins at noon with gourd dancing and giveaways, features American Indian dancers and drummers. Vendors will sell American Indian cuisine, clothing, art and jewelry. The Grand Entry, a procession of about 100 dancers, begins at 6 p.m.